Bob Langert's Long, Strange Trip to Green the Golden Arches

Bob Langert worked in logistics for McDonald's in the late 1980s when he was asked to take on a "temporary" six-month assignment to get chlorofluorocarbons out of the company's clamshell packages.

Twenty years later, Bob has worked with WWF and Conservation International on marine stewardship and sustainable beef, spent a decade with Temple Grandin dealing with animal welfare issues, visited chicken farms and slaughterhouses, picked tomatoes with migrant workers in Florida, lectured on sustainability in China and taken a nine-day raft trip down the Amazon River with his pals at Greenpeace.

"I never, ever imagined this," Bob said. "To have the good fortune to do this work, and make a difference in the world is beyond my expectations."

State of Green Business

I interviewed Bob, who is vice president for corporate social responsibility, at McDonald's, last week at the State of Green Business Forum in Chicago. We talked about what he'd learned about working with NGOs, his accomplishments, frustrations and whether selling hamburgers can be "green."

Here are a few highlights:

A pioneering partnership: Langert's work with packaging led to a partnership with the Environmental Defense Fund, which ruffled feathers in the corporate world and the environmental community.

"Fred Krupp [EDF's chief] was a visionary back then," Bob said. "It was not politically correct to work with big companies."

EDF's crew did a shift working in a McDonald's, and proceeded to help with dozens of initiatives -- from trimming the size of straws to using recycled paper in napkins.

Recalled Bob: "We didn't spend one penny more. We saved millions and millions of pounds of packaging and costs."

The future of fish: McDonald's joined with the WWF to develop guidelines for the companies that supply its fish. What's the business case, I asked, for investing corporate time and money in sustainable fisheries?