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Newsletter // GreenBuzz Daily, Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Meet Michael Meehan, GRI's new CEO

Published August 19, 2014
Meet Michael Meehan, GRI's new CEO

Last month, the Global Reporting Initiative hired its first new CEO in more than a decade, a veteran sustainability executive with a deep background in tech.

The leadership comes at a crossroads for the sustainability reporting movement, and Michael Meehan's job description is pretty daunting.

Tactically speaking, Meehan is responsible for steeping GRI in new methodologies for natural capital and integrated reporting.

Strategically speaking, he'll need to help GRI forge much tighter collaborations and relationships with other key stakeholders shaping sustainability reporting.

Oh, and did we mention his ongoing role as an advocate for better corporate transparency?

"Having demonstrated entrepreneurial leadership, strategic vision, as well as significant management abilities, it is clear to the GRI board that Michael is the ideal person to lead us forward," said Chairman Christianna Wood, announcing his appointment. "Michael shares GRI's vision of a sustainable global economy and is committed to continuing GRI's ground-breaking leadership to make sustainability and human rights issues integral parts of how all organizations are managed."

So, this summer, Meehan is packing up his stuff in Austin, Texas, to make the cross-Atlantic move to GRI's Amsterdam headquarters. He took a break to speak with me about his priorities. Here are three of my biggest takeaways:

1. He loves the word 'multi-stakeholder'

Some GRI nostalgia: The non-profit organization was set up in 1997 by CERES and the United Nations Environment Program, with the overarching mission of making sustainability reporting a standard corporate practice. According to its latest figures, more than 19,000 people worldwide are trained on GRI methodologies, and more than 5,000 businesses issue reports based on its framework (including more than 1,500 private companies).

Those numbers thrill Meehan, but he downplays the obsession on specific reporting audiences — such as those worried about Securities and Exchange Commission requirements — that got us here. For Meehan, the focus is on holistic data collection and transparency, regardless of who will see it.

"We've got all of this information, all of this interest from the corporate world, really for the first time," he said. "But if we focus only on investors, these other organizations — human rights, labor and social — don't get a seat at the table."

2. He wants to make more friends

How does GRI's reporting framework relate to methodologies developed by CDP (formerly Carbon Disclosure Project) versus the Dow Jones Sustainability Index versus the International Integrated Reporting Council versus the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board.

To Meehan, the difference is obvious. But the reality is there's a lot of confusion among sustainability professionals about whether these initiatives are complementary or competitive. Meehan wants to clarify these relationships, so you'll see him in much closer touch with other standards bodies. "We all know each other," he said. "We need to get better about sharing resources."

3. He's a fan of 'open source' innovation

Meehan's background in technology, as CEO of software developers Carbonetworks (acquired in 2011 by Infor) and iVeridis, will inform his master plan to turn GRI data in "a launchpad for innovation around sustainability."

What the heck does that mean? The answer lies in new products and services powered by Big Data analytics. As an example, Meehan points out that the business intelligence behind Bloomberg's BNA news service is contributed by GRI's databases.

Increasingly, GRI's focus will be on creating a platform that allows data to be shared and combined with other metrics far more easily, to create valuable new insights. "We don’t need more reports, we need more information," Meehan said.

Top image of Michael Meehan courtesy of GRI.



How to keep up with the evolving recycling system

Published August 19, 2014
How to keep up with the evolving recycling system

Looking back at packaging over the past 25 years, a lot has changed. There is a great deal of discussion in the recycling community about the "evolving bale," a reference to changes in the material mix over the past decades. Over that time, there have been declines in newspaper, glass, steel and aluminum. These are the commodities that the U.S. municipal recycling system was built on.

As we have witnessed the decline of the newspaper, we have also seen the growth of single-use packaging and a convenience-is-king mindset. Needless to say, consumer behavior has changed and is reflected in the way we recycle. Due to the economics and added convenience, the U.S. largely has moved away from source separated to single stream recycling (all recyclables in one bin).

The dirty truth about the single stream

The result is a greater volume of recyclables collected but with more contamination due in large part to a more complex material stream. Part of this complexity is from the growth and diversity of plastics. They are 12 percent of all waste generated in the U.S. The consequence of the changing waste stream has been a flattening of the amount of municipal solid waste generated per capita. It represents a de-linkage in the amount of waste generated relative to gross domestic product and is due in large part to the shift in the U.S. material mix from heavier (paper, glass, steel) to lighter materials (plastics) and a general dematerialization of society as the digital revolution continues to grow.

While packaging was evolving, material recovery facilities were too. It used to be that every municipality owned its own, but now a good portion are privately owned. MRFs originally were designed to recover paper and rigid materials and were technologically pretty basic. Today's MRFs resemble a Rube Goldberg device of screens, conveyers, magnets and technologies that move at dizzying speeds to make order out of chaos.

The shift in material mix along with single stream has had a profound impact on MRF operations and on the commodities they produce. For instance, the well-meaning consumer who reuses a plastic bag for recyclables is unknowingly introducing a material that causes operational nightmares. There used to be a number of paper grades. Some almost have disappeared. Paper bales are now frequently contaminated with plastic.

From the bin to …?

On the positive side, we now recover a variety of PET grades, HDPE and mixed rigid grades. One consequence of a lightweighted waste stream is that a higher volume of material needs to be processed to create a ton of recovered material along with losses due to residue and contamination that are higher today than in the past. So the lightweighting of the U.S. waste stream actually has had something of a perverse economic impact at the MRF.

Attention is needed. Signals from paper companies unhappy with the declining quality of paper from recycling programs. China's Green Fence is an industry-wide challenge to the quality of materials coming out of the U.S. and the need to examine our system and practices. To maintain a strong recycling system, the economic value of commodities must be preserved and quality is core to that value.

Credit: Becky Snyder via FlickrValue comes from upstream considerations such as how to design packaging for bale value, consistent education of consumers and keeping them informed of recycling best practices while renewing our attention to best practices in collection systems (convenient access and carts) and continued upgrading of MRFs with next generation sorting technology. Material manufacturers, converters, brands, retailers and municipalities, consumers and MRF operators all have a role to play.

And then there needs to be some reality about the continuing pressure for more convenience at a reduced cost. Mixed waste processing, or a "dirty MRF," is where trash and recyclables are comingled — which could seem like the ultimate single stream — yet in reality is a fall back to practices used in societies with no habit of recycling and that recycling best practices have been targeting for years to eliminate. While metals and a limited selection of plastics can be recovered, the quality of material entering a dirty MRF is highly contaminated because it is mixed with wet wastes such as food and chemicals. Little of the paper can be recovered, and no high-value products can be made from it. Paper and paperboard are almost 30 percent of what is generated in any community, so convenience comes at a high cost in terms of lost quality and resources.

More concerning is associating recycling with trash. Equating them in the minds of consumers takes away the signal about valuing materials and eliminates essential feedback for consumers. In a world of scarce resources instilling stewardship is essential to more sustainable development. Increasingly, research shows that recycling makes consumers feel good, reminds them their actions matter and collectively makes a difference. If we evolve consumers out the recycling value chain, recycling loses.

Top image of recycling symbol by dotpolka via Flickr.



Conflict minerals reports are filed, but what do they say?

Published August 19, 2014
Conflict minerals reports are filed, but what do they say?

Most filers in this initial disclosure year were unable to determine the origin of conflict minerals (tantalum, tin, tungsten and gold, known collectively as 3TG) in their products. They described their conflict minerals status as "undeterminable" or made no declaration. While some stakeholders were anxious to see what companies had to say, those participating in efforts to comply with the SEC's new conflict mineral rule know well the challenges of completing these first-year filings. The complexity of supply chains created challenges for most companies. And there is still a long way to go.

Ernst & Young's recent study of conflict minerals filings — which may help serve as an early guide to the 3TG disclosure landscape and help facilitate an assessment of how companies compare — found data about reporting across all SEC reporting companies.

General trends

A little over 1,300 companies filed a Form SD, and almost 80 percent of these companies filed a Conflict Mineral Report exhibit. These figures were significantly lower than initial estimates of around 6,000 impacted companies and 4,500 that would be required to file a CMR. This raises the question of how the initial estimates could be so far off.

Only four companies obtained an independent private sector audit of their CMR that included the design of the due diligence framework used and activities undertaken. The vast majority indicated their reports were not subject to an IPSA, as the rule provides a two-year transition period for companies whose conflict mineral status is uncertain.

Most SD filers were headquartered in North America (85 percent), followed by Europe (10 percent), the Asia-Pacific (3 percent) and other areas around the globe (2 percent).

Digging deeper

A close review of filings across S&P 500 companies turned up the following specifics.

Most companies were unable to determine the origin of 3TG in their products and will need the additional time under the transition period of the rule to work with suppliers. Many of these companies have complex supply chains and reported that suppliers did not respond to questionnaires or did not provide complete or adequate responses. Of those companies filing a CMR, only about half disclosed a supplier response rate, 40 percent identified the actual number of RCOI suppliers surveyed and 27 percent provided a list of smelters and refiners.

Around 90 percent of Form SD filings came from companies in 10 sectors, with a high concentration in the technology, diversified industrial products, consumer products and retail and wholesale sectors. Conflict minerals were not found to be a necessary part of the supply chains for companies in only a few select sectors: airlines, asset management, biotechnology, insurance and real estate.

The supply chain complexities will make it very difficult for most companies to ever definitively determine the conflict mineral status of their products. For those that eventually do, it may take years of due diligence efforts before they can credibly reach such determination.

Top image of tin ore by Sasha Lezhnev/Enoughproject.org via Flickr.




New Jersey creates the nation's first Energy Resilience Bank

Published August 19, 2014
New Jersey creates the nation's first Energy Resilience Bank

The Third National Climate Assessment, published in May by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, affirmed that extreme weather events such as Superstorm Sandy in 2012 are already on the increase due to climate change. While scientists are cautious about attributing single weather events to climate change, a 2013 report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration concluded, "climate-change related increases in sea level have nearly doubled today's annual probability of a Sandy-level flood recurrence as compared to 1950."

The Northeastern U.S., which bore the brunt of Sandy's devastation, is therefore more likely to experience an increase in extreme weather events in the form of hurricanes. As the effects of Sandy indicated, the infrastructure of most if not all states in the path of hurricanes is unprepared to deal with such events. The way in which electrical power is distributed — through centralized grids — makes the region far more vulnerable to massive power outages.

Resilience for "critical facilities"

In New Jersey alone, more than 2 million households lost power during Sandy, many of them for extended periods of time. Recognizing that centralized grids are insufficient for dealing with such extreme weather events, the state recently announced (PDF) that it has taken steps to establish the nation's first Energy Resilience Bank.

"Utilizing $200 million through New Jersey's second Community Development Block Grant-Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) allocation, the ERB will support the development of distributed energy resources at critical facilities throughout the state," a press release stated.

The ERB will provide funding in the forms of low-interest loans and grants "to critical facilities that offer the greatest resilience benefits for the State." The first priority of the ERB will be providing distributed energy solutions to water and wastewater treatment plants.

Due to power outages in water and wastewater treatment plants during the storm, millions of gallons of raw sewage were dumped directly into the state's waterways.

"Distributed energy resources, including combined heat and power (CHP), fuel cells (FC) and off-grid solar inverters with battery storage, allowed some critical facilities, such as hospitals, wastewater treatment plants and universities, to remain operational while the electric grid was down," the state reported. "The launch of the ERB will enable many more such facilities to remain operational during future outages. In addition to providing resilience, the benefits of distributed energy resources also include lower and stable energy costs, a cleaner environment through reduced emissions, and increased overall efficiency."

The nation is watching the first ERB

"New Jersey has created a model to finance resilient power projects, to protect against power outages during severe weather events," Lewis Mildord, President of Clean Energy Group, wrote. "The ERB is an important way for states to finance projects like solar with energy storage in food banks, fire stations, wastewater treatment plants, and schools. This is a model that other states should track and evaluate for possible replication."

Mildord also noted that in addition to low-interest loans and grants, the ERB "can also provide credit enhancement for bond issuances and other private financing participations." Such participations seem to fit the community investment strategies of sustainable investors. In 2012, in the aftermath of Sandy, Community Capital Management, a Florida-based fixed income investment manager, invested $100 million in disaster recovery and redevelopment projects in the Northeast.

Top image of power lines by ArtisticPhoto via Shutterstock. This article first appeared at SocialFunds.com.



Author Wendell Berry speaks out for local farming and the land

By Roger Cohn
Published August 19, 2014
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Tags: Agriculture, Food & Agriculture, More... Agriculture, Food & Agriculture, Metals & Mining
Author Wendell Berry speaks out for local farming and the land

This article was originally published by Yale Environment 360 and is reprinted here with permission.

Wendell Berry wrote about and practiced "sustainable agriculture" long before the term was widely used. His 1977 book "The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture," in which he argued against industrial agriculture and for small-scale, local-based farming, had a strong influence on the environmental and local food movements in the U.S.

Berry long has balanced the diverse roles of writer, activist, teacher and farmer. At age 79, he still lives on the farm near Port Royal, Ky., where he grew up, and uses traditional methods to work the land there. And he still speaks eloquently about the importance of local communities and of caring for the land, while warning of the destructive potential of industrialization and technology.

In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Berry talked about his Kentucky farm and why he has remained there, why he would risk arrest to protest mountaintop removal mining, why the sustainable agriculture movement faces an uphill battle and why strong rural communities are important. "A deep familiarity between a local community and a local landscape is a dear thing, just in human terms," Berry said. "It's also, down the line, money in the bank, because it helps you to preserve the working capital of the place."

Yale Environment 360: You've been writing about and practicing what is now known as sustainable agriculture since before that term was widely used. In recent years, there's been a movement among some people toward sustainable agriculture. Do you feel sustainable agriculture is gaining ground in a significant way that could slow the growth of industrial agriculture, or is it more of a boutique type of thing?

Wendell Berry: Well, we are a young country. By the time settlement reached Kentucky it was 1775, and the industrial revolution was already underway. So we've been 238 years in Kentucky, we Old World people. And what we have done there in that time has not been sustainable. In fact, it has been the opposite. There's less now of everything in the way of natural gifts, less of everything than what was there when we came. Sometimes we have radically reduced the original gift. And so for Americans to talk about sustainability is a bit of a joke, because we haven't sustained anything very long — and a lot of things we haven't sustained at all.

The acreage that is now under the influence of the local food effort or the sustainable agriculture effort is at present tiny, and industrial agriculture is blasting ahead at a great rate. For instance, in the last two years, the high price of corn and soybeans has driven that kind of agriculture into the highly vulnerable uplands of my home country. I can show you farms that in my lifetime have been mostly in grass that are now suddenly covered, line fence to line fence, with monocultures of corn or beans. ...

So we have these two things, a promising start on what we call, loosely, sustainable land use, and we have a still far larger industrial extractive agriculture operating, really, against the land.

e360: On your place where you live now and farm, what are some practices that you employ and use to take good care of the land and make it sustainable?

Berry: The farm that my wife and I have is in every way marginal. Every foot of it is either steep, which is most of it, or it floods [laughs]. So it's land that you can learn a lot from in a hurry because it is so demanding of care. The way to deal with that land is to keep it covered with permanent pasture or woodland. We have some slopes in pasture that ought to have remained woodland, but we've kept most of it going the way it came to us.

e360: And do you do forest logging there as well?

Berry: Most of our woodland we don't use, but some we use for firewood, an occasional saw log, fence posts, that sort of thing. The emerald ash borer [a destructive beetle] is now among us, and we are cutting the large trees that the emerald ash borer has killed. The ash wood is valuable as sawed lumber, and it's also wonderful firewood. … My son does woodworking, and so it's worthwhile to him to have supplies of sawed boards laid up.

e360: You write a lot about local agriculture and the local economy, about local traditions and the importance of connections to the land. Why do you think this is so important?

Berry: That starts with the obvious perception that land that is in human use requires human care. And this calls for keeping in mind the history of such land, of what has worked well on it and the mistakes that have been made on it. To lose this living memory of what has happened to the place is really to lose an economic asset.

I'm more and more concerned with the economic values of such intangibles as affection, knowledge and memory. A deep familiarity between a local community and the local landscape is a dear thing, just in human terms. It's also, down the line, money in the bank because it helps you to preserve the working capital of the place.

e360: You along with Wes Jackson of the Land Institute have proposed a 50-year farm bill. Can you explain what that is and how it would differ from typical U.S. farm bills?

Berry: Unlike the typical U.S. farm bill, the 50-year farm bill attempts to address the real and ongoing problems of agriculture: erosion, toxicity, loss of genetic and species diversity, and the destruction of rural communities, or the destruction, where it still survives, of the culture of husbandry. It begins with the fact that at present, 80 percent of the land is planted annually in annual crops such as corn and beans, and 20 percent in perennials. It proposes a 50-year program for the gradual inversion of that ratio to 80 percent perennial cover and 20 percent annuals. It's pretty clear that annual plants are nature's emergency service. They're the plants that come in after, say, a landslide, after the land has been exposed, and they give it a temporary cover while the perennials are getting started. So our predominantly annual agriculture keeps the land in a state of emergency.

It's hard to make a permanent agriculture on the basis of an emergency strategy. By now the planted acreages have grown so large that most soybean and corn fields, for instance, are not seeded to cover crops, and so they lie exposed to the weather all winter. You can drive through Iowa in April before the new crops have been planted and started to grow, and you don't see anything green mile after mile. It's more deserted than a desert. And the soil erosion rates in Iowa are scandalous.

e360: I know you've had people tell you that your writing has inspired them to think about chucking their jobs and their city life and go farm. What do you tell them?

Berry: Well, I try to recommend caution. You don't want somebody who's 45 or 50 years old, who doesn't know anything about farming, to throw up his or her present life and undertake to make a living from farming at a time when farmers, experienced farmers, are failing and going out of business. So characteristically I've said, "If you do this, keep your town job. If you're not independently wealthy, you've got to have a dependable income from somewhere off the farm." And I've tried to stress the difference between depending on the weather, on nature, for an income and depending on a salary. There's a very wide gulf between those two kinds of dependence.

Credit: iLoveMountains.org

e360: Three years ago you participated in a sit-in at the governor's office in Kentucky over the issue of mountaintop removal mining. What was that like, and why did you get involved with it in the first place?

Berry: I got involved because I was tired of talking. I saw that we were going to Frankfort [the state capital] every year and trying to talk to senators and representatives in the General Assembly, and to the governor if we could. Their very understandable impulse was to get rid of us as quickly as possible and have us leave feeling good. … There are two parties in Kentucky — the party of coal and the party of everything else. Both the Democratic politicians and the Republican politicians, mostly, in most areas of the state, have to pay homage to coal to even think about running for office.

So it was clear that talking wasn't going to do any good. I don't think what we wound up doing did any good either, but we had to raise the stakes somehow. And so we did go to Frankfort, confront the governor, and we had a list of requests that he would have to grant or he would not get rid of us. And he pulled a pretty smart trick on us. He invited us to spend the weekend. For obvious reasons, he didn't want pictures in the paper of these innocent people being led off in handcuffs, and he said, "Just stay, be my guests." He outsmarted us. But he couldn't neutralize us — the circumstance that he put us in really gave us a lot of visibility, a lot of contact with the press, and attracted a lot of sympathy.

e360: Do you think any positive developments have occurred since then?

Berry: No. I think we've got to keep up our opposition to land abuse and we've got to continue to communicate what that's all about and what it signifies. What it signifies is that some people are willing to go the limit in earth destruction, to put it entirely at risk and destroy it entirely to preserve "our way of life." A lot of people are willing to tolerate that.

Mountaintop removal is as near total destruction as you can imagine, because it does away with the forest, it does away with the topsoil that sustained the forest, it does away with the very topography — even people's family graveyards go. And it's done in complete disregard not only of the land but of the people who live downhill, whose lives are threatened, whose water supplies are destroyed, whose homes are damaged. The people downhill, downstream and ahead of us in time are totally disregarded.

e360: As someone who's followed your writing over the years, it seems to me that in some ways you've become more radical in your thinking, unlike a lot of people who as they get older tend to become more conservative. Do you think that's true, and if so, why?

Berry: It's true. One reason is that as I've grown older I've understood more clearly the difficulties that we're in, the bad fix that we're in and that we're leaving to our children. And as I've grown older I've understood that when I put my comfort on the line as a protester or whatever, I'm doing what old people ought to do. I have less life to live than the young people. I think the old people ought to be the first ones in line to risk arrest.

e360: I've heard you describing the difference between optimism and hope, and you said that in terms of the issues you really care about, you would not describe yourself as optimistic but as hopeful. Can you explain that?

Berry: The issue of hope is complex and the sources of hope are complex. The things hoped for tend to be specific and to imply an agenda of work, things that can be done. Optimism is a general program that suggests that things are going to come out swell, pretty much whether we help out or not. This is largely unjustified by circumstances and history. One of the things that I think people on my side of these issues are always worried about is the ready availability of cynicism, despair, nihilism — those things that really are luxuries that permit people to give up, relax about the problems. Relax and let them happen. Another thing that can bring that about is so-called objectivity — the idea that this way might be right but on the other hand the opposite way might be right. We find this among academic people pretty frequently — the idea that you don't take a stand, you just talk about the various possibilities.

But our side requires commitment, it requires effort, it requires a continual effort to define and understand what is possible — not only what is desirable, but what is possible in the immediate circumstances.

e360: You've had many opportunities over the years to leave Port Royal — you had teaching jobs at universities — but you made the decision to go back and stay there. Why?

Berry: Well, because I love the place. Both my father and my mother came from the Port Royal neighborhood, and I was one of the farm-raised young people who loved both farming and the place. Port Royal is what a lot of people have been schooled to call "nowhere." I remember a college student who told me, "I'm from a little nowhere place in Illinois." And I said, "Wait a minute. I want to ask you something: Who told you that where you come from in Illinois is nowhere? There is no such place as nowhere." We've dumped our garbage in our places, we've polluted them and mistreated them in every way, because we thought they were nowhere. It's extremely important, it seems to me, that those nowhere places should be inhabited by people who will speak for them.

e360: You've had four careers, really — writer, farmer, activist and teacher. How do you see those parts of your life fitting together?

Berry: A question I'm often asked is, "How have you balanced these various pursuits?" And the word "balance" always implies that I have balanced them, and of course I haven't. It's been difficult and sometimes a struggle to keep it all going.

e360: Difficult in what way?

Berry: Well, to find time for it all. I've known writers — I think it's true also of other artists — who thought that you had to put your art before everything. But if you have a marriage and a family and a farm, you're just going to find that you can't always put your art first, and moreover that you shouldn't. There are a number of things more important than your art. It's wrong to favor it over your family, or over your place, or over your animals.

Top image of Wendell Berry by Center for Interfaith Relations via Flickr.

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Roger Cohn

Executive Editor
Yale Environment 360
Roger Cohn is executive editor of Yale Environment 360.

Allie Rutherford

Director of Corporate Governance
Ernst & Young
Allie Rutherford leads Ernst & Young LLP's Corporate Governance Center, which seeks to foster alignment among investors, boards of directors and management on corporate governance matters, raising awareness, encouraging understanding and serving as a conduit of information. The Center provides thought leadership and company-level analysis, offering a balanced perspective on corporate governance trends, leading practices and the impact of governance decisions on shareholder actions and proxy voting.
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    ...Read More
    Complimentary GreenBiz Webcast

    Surviving the Coming Utility Revolution
    In association with Shelton Group


    Join us on Tuesday, September 9th at 12:00pm PT/3:00pm ET for a free, hour-long webcast, where three global brands — Johnson & Johnson, Microsoft and Wal-Mart — will provide insight into how their needs are changing, what they’re looking for today and how that’s likely to change in the near-term future. Register Today!


    Grid Thinking

    New Jersey creates the nation's first Energy Resilience Bank
    By Robert Kropp

    The state-run bank will use Superstorm Sandy disaster relief funds to help finance increasing the number of distributed energy resources.

    ...Read More


    How microgrid subscriptions can strengthen the New York grid
    By Elisa Wood

    Central Hudson Gas & Electric's two-year plan includes building microgrids and increasing community solar. ...Read More

    Sponsored Content

    Join the HP Living Progress Exchange – September 9, 2014


    Help us answer “How can we create a better future for everyone, together?” Join this global, on-line discussion hosted by HP and moderated by GlobeScan along with experts from academia, business, civil society, and government. Register now.


    GreenBiz Focus on BT

    What makes BT's Net Good carbon program a game-changer?
    By Susan Nickbarg

    We interview the U.K. broadband giant's Kevin Moss about results, plans and hopes to go net positive....Read More

     
    Sponsored Content

    Turning Title 24 Regulations into Smart Savings


    In California, energy efficiency standards are set in the state’s Code of Regulations Title 24. The California Energy Commission recently updated its Title 24 Energy Efficiency standards requiring businesses to implement technologies that enable highly efficient and zero-net-energy buildings with systems that are integrated with advanced communications capabilities. Learn more about the new legislation, what it means to you and how you can become compliant. Download the free whitepaper here.


    White Papers

  • Addressing Transparency Expectations in the Metals and Mining Sector
  • Energy Efficiency Playbook – Lighting
  • Essential Guide to Lighting Retrofits & Upgrades
  • Open Standards-Driven Wireless Building Energy Management
  • Mack Technologies Achieves Unprecedented Wireless Control
  • 14 Strategies to Save up to 70% in Energy Costs Using the Latest in Warehouse Lighting...and More
  • Turning Title 24 Regulations into Smart Savings
  • Unlocking ROI+: Understanding the Complete Return on Smart Building Investments
  • 5 Common Myths About Project Financing
  • Corporate Sustainability Practices: Waste & Recycling
  • Verifying Environmental Sustainability in the Electronics Marketplace
  • A Benchmark Study of Current Practices and Tools for Sustainability
  • How HP achieves leadership in sustainable product footprinting at a fraction of the cost
  • Increasing Transparency of Environment and Health Claims for Cleaning Products
  • Creating Healthier Furniture and Building Materials by Minimizing Chemical Emissions
  • Driving Performance and Transparency in Green Building Products
  • Transparency and the Role of Environmental Product Declarations
  • The Product Mindset
  • Can You Save Millions with Sustainable Packaging Design?
  • NAEM Trends Report: Planning for a Sustainable Future
  • Guide to Energy, Carbon and Sustainability Software
  • Six growing trends in corporate sustainability

  • August 21, 2014
    GreenBuzz
     
     
     
    Upcoming Events
    Silent Partners: Truly Local Food
    Thu, Aug 28
    Toronto ON

    GreenChill Webinar on August 28: Case Door Retrofits
    Thu, Aug 28


    Building the Resilient City: Risks and Opportunities
    Thu, Sep 4 - Fri, Sep 5
    San Francisco CA

    Forecasting Opportunities In The Booming EH&S Software Market
    Thu, Sep 4
    London, UK

    Water Stewardship: Facilitating Business Action to Solve Water Challenges
    Mon, Sep 8
    Washington DC


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    Green Jobs & Careers
    Program Associate
    Montpelier, VT

    Senior Foundations Officer
    Cambridge, MA

    Sustainability Coordinator
    Redwood City, CA

    Intern
    San Jose, CA

    Business Development / Sales Professional - Construction
    Irvine, CA

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    © 2014 GreenBiz Group - GreenBiz.com® is a registered trademark of GreenBiz Group Inc, Oakland, CA USA
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    What Goes Around, Comes Around

    Why the world's biggest companies are investing in recycling
    By Joel Makower

    Interest in recycling is looping back around. Here's $100 million to make that happen.

    ...Read More


    How to keep up with the evolving recycling system
    By Anne Johnson

    There's a dirty undercurrent to single-stream recycling. Here's how companies and consumers can help clean it up.

    ...Read More


    North Face treks towards ambitious recycled materials goal

    The outdoor clothes and equipment company plans to use only recycled polyester by 2016.

    ...Read More
    Sponsored Content

    Addressing Transparency Expectations in the Metals and Mining Sector


    Are you a material supplier concerned with increasing demands for sustainability performance data? Or, are you a manufacturer wondering what raw materials suppliers are doing to demonstrate their sustainability performance? Here’s an article that looks at supplier transparency through the lens of the Metals and Mining industry. Broad lessons can be drawn about next steps for suppliers and the state of supply chain engagement for manufacturers. Download the article here.


    Superheroes and Tigers

    The Solutions Project's green superheroes use science and stardom
    By Garrett Hering

    Josh Fox, Marko Krapels, Mark Jacobson and Mark Ruffalo join forces to boost renewables. Backed by science and full of popular appeal, it's a smash.

    ...Read More


    Kellogg's sets crunch time goals for climate
    By Will Nichols

    All suppliers will be required to reduce, measure and disclose their greenhouse gas emissions by the end of 2015....Read More

    Sponsored Content

    Essential Guide to Lighting Retrofits & Upgrades


    At a time when commercial lighting systems account for over 50% of the total electricity used for lighting - retrofits and upgrades that allow lighting systems to use energy more efficiently are an obvious place to start. Learn what you need to know when making a decision: trends, stats, lighting controls, and other building-wide control systems. Click here to download the free report.


    GreenBiz Focus on GRI

    Meet Michael Meehan, GRI's new CEO
    By Heather Clancy

    More than 5,000 businesses already use the reporting framework, but Michael Meehan wants transparency to become second nature....Read More

     
    Sponsored Content

    Energy Efficiency Playbook – Lighting


    Need help explaining in plain English to a CFO or building owner how to evaluate an energy efficiency project proposal? The Noesis Playbook is here to help. Every Noesis Playbook offers key steps to help financial decision makers evaluate energy efficiency investments. In the first of a series, this Playbook helps building owners and CFOs make informed decisions about lighting projects. Download the free playbook here.


    White Papers

  • Addressing Transparency Expectations in the Metals and Mining Sector
  • Energy Efficiency Playbook – Lighting
  • Essential Guide to Lighting Retrofits & Upgrades
  • Open Standards-Driven Wireless Building Energy Management
  • Mack Technologies Achieves Unprecedented Wireless Control
  • 14 Strategies to Save up to 70% in Energy Costs Using the Latest in Warehouse Lighting...and More
  • Turning Title 24 Regulations into Smart Savings
  • Unlocking ROI+: Understanding the Complete Return on Smart Building Investments
  • 5 Common Myths About Project Financing
  • Corporate Sustainability Practices: Waste & Recycling
  • Verifying Environmental Sustainability in the Electronics Marketplace
  • A Benchmark Study of Current Practices and Tools for Sustainability
  • How HP achieves leadership in sustainable product footprinting at a fraction of the cost
  • Increasing Transparency of Environment and Health Claims for Cleaning Products
  • Creating Healthier Furniture and Building Materials by Minimizing Chemical Emissions
  • Driving Performance and Transparency in Green Building Products
  • Transparency and the Role of Environmental Product Declarations
  • The Product Mindset
  • Can You Save Millions with Sustainable Packaging Design?
  • NAEM Trends Report: Planning for a Sustainable Future
  • Guide to Energy, Carbon and Sustainability Software
  • Six growing trends in corporate sustainability

  • August 19, 2014
    GreenBuzz
     
     
     
    Upcoming Events
    GEO Appathon 2014
    Wed, May 7 - Sun, Aug 31
    Virtual Event

    First California Adaptation Forum
    Tue, Aug 19 - Wed, Aug 20
    Sacramento

    Sustainable Entrepreneurs Panel
    Tue, Aug 19
    Minneapolis MN

    Silent Partners: Truly Local Food
    Thu, Aug 28
    Toronto ON

    EPI's 4th Annual Energy Policy Research Conference
    Thu, Sep 4 - Fri, Sep 5
    San Francisco CA


    » Post An Event
    » More Events
    Green Jobs & Careers
    Senior Foundations Officer
    Cambridge, MA

    Sustainability Coordinator
    Redwood City, CA

    Intern
    San Jose, CA

    Business Development / Sales Professional - Construction
    Irvine, CA

    Associate, Database Management
    Boston, MA

    » Post A Job
    » Browse All Jobs
    » Green Career Resources
    Talk to GreenBiz: Have a story idea, insider tip, favorite resource to share? Send it to us
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    © 2014 GreenBiz Group - GreenBiz.com® is a registered trademark of GreenBiz Group Inc, Oakland, CA USA
    © GreenBiz Group Inc. All rights reserved.
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