Waste Management Inc. Offsets Greenhouse Gas at Super Bowl

Waste Management Inc. Offsets Greenhouse Gas at Super Bowl

Waste Management, Inc. supported Houston's effort to make Super Bowl XXXVIII a cleaner and greener event by donating 85,000 metric tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent emission credits to the city of Houston. The donation is expected to more than offset the greenhouse gas impact of the Super Bowl.

The CO2 donations being made to the city come from Waste Management's Bluebonnet landfill site, located in Harris County, Texas.

"For more than 15 years, Waste Management has combined state-of-the-art technology with environmental and operational expertise to significantly reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions from our landfills," said A. Maurice Myers, president and CEO of Waste Management, Inc. "As one of the largest private registrants of greenhouse gas emission credits, we are pleased to offer this resource and support the effort to make Super Bowl XXXVIII a cleaner and greener event."

Waste Management supported a similar venture involving the donation of 120,000 tonnes of greenhouse gas emission credits to the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah. Waste Management's donation was part of the Olympic Cleaner and Greener Program; an environmental program that created the first games in Olympic history to have a net zero effect on the air quality of a host city.

Landfill gas is produced through the natural breakdown of waste deposited in a landfill. As the waste decomposes, methane gas is produced. This gas is recovered by a series of wells that are drilled into the landfill. The wells are interconnected by a common collection system that transports the gas to a compression facility.

There, the gas is compressed, dried and filtered before being sent through turbines or engines to produce energy. Greenhouse gas emissions credits are generated by the voluntary capture and destruction of methane component in landfill gas.

Waste Management currently supplies landfill gas to 72 gas-to-energy projects in 22 states across the country. Altogether, these projects supply more than 200 megawatts of electricity, or enough power for 180,000 homes, while direct sales of methane gas to industrial users replace over two million barrels of oil each year.
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