BP, Cinergy Earn EPA Nod for Combined Heat and Power Project

BP, Cinergy Earn EPA Nod for Combined Heat and Power Project

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have awarded BP Global Power Corp. and Cinergy Solutions with the 2005 Energy Star Combined Heat and Power Award for the pollution reduction and energy-efficiency impacts of their South Houston Green Power (SHGP) combined heat and power project in Texas City, Texas. The project also received the 2003 EPA Combined Heat and Power Certificate of Recognition.

Cinergy Solutions operates the existing steam and electric generating facility at BP's refining and chemical complex in Texas City. The project included decommissioning heat and power equipment that did not meet today's standards, which allowed Cinergy Solutions to switch the gas turbine and boiler from independent operation to run as a combined heat and power (CHP) unit. In addition, SHGP constructed, owns and operates a state-of-the-art natural gas cogeneration project at the site.

Built through a joint venture between Cinergy Solutions and BP, the plant enables BP to reduce its nitrogen oxide emissions by 53% at Texas City. Operating at nearly 78% efficiency, this outstanding example of CHP uses 33% less fuel than typical onsite thermal generation and purchased electricity resulting in annual CO2 reductions of approximately 1.94 million tons.

CHP is a clean, efficient and reliable means of generating power and thermal energy simultaneously from a single fuel source. Installing a CHP system to meet thermal and electrical needs can increase operational efficiency and decrease energy costs, while reducing emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, that contribute to the risks of climate change. The U.S. EPA supports combined heat and power because it is more energy efficient and has fewer emissions than separate heat and power. CHP systems typically achieve effective electrical efficiencies of 50% to 70%, compared to 33% for fossil-fueled power plants.