U.K. Wind-Power Supplies Grow One Third in One Year

U.K. Wind-Power Supplies Grow One Third in One Year

An annual study of the country's renewable energy sourcing finds that wind power is leading the surge as it generates an increasing share of U.K. electricity.

Energy statistics published by the Department of Environment and Climate Change as part of The Digest of UK Energy Statistics (DUKES) 2010 show the amount of energy put into the grid by the country's wind farms last year hit 2.5 percent of Britain's total.

That is a 31 percent increase on the previous year, against a more modest increase of 20 percent for renewable energy sources as a whole.

Maria McCaffery chief executive of trade association RenewableUK welcomed the figures whilst urging government to set tougher targets.

She said: "It is good news to see the role of renewables in meeting our energy needs is rising and in particular the significant contribution from the wind industry.

"These are promising statistics but we must go further and act faster. With one third of our power supply needing to be replaced by 2015 we cannot delay in greater deployment of clean energy technologies.

"If we are to avoid an energy gap and secure our supplies for the future, we must maintain momentum to deliver a robust renewable energy industry that will lead to the creation of thousands of green jobs."

She added "Meeting our 2020 renewable energy targets will be largely dependent on Britain unlocking its offshore wind potential.

"The UK is capable of delivering 49GW of electricity from this sector over the next decade; more than half our current energy needs.

"However, achieving this goal will require strong political will and a policy framework that ensures Britain does not lose out to the rest of the world in this burgeoning industry."

Between 2008 and 2009 the amount of electricity from renewable sources grew 20 percent from 5.6 percent to 6.7 percent of the UK total with just under half from wind power.