First Takes: UK Waste-to-Energy Plant Gets Trashed, Trump v. Wind Farm, & More...

First Takes: UK Waste-to-Energy Plant Gets Trashed, Trump v. Wind Farm, & More...

Landfill image CC-licensed by USACEpublicaffairs/Flickr

• U.K. Waste-to-Energy Plant Trashed: Uncertainty over U.K. government subsidies has stalled the creation of a plant that would turn 300,000 tonnes of trash into gas, reports the Guardian. "The plant joins a growing list of renewable energy projects that have been thrown into doubt as ministers continue to debate the value and extent of future subsidies for green energy," the paper reports. The plant, if built and fully operational, would produce enough energy for 50,000 homes.

• Eating the Way to Sustainability: Barton Seaver, executive chef at Hook in Washington, D.C., tells Grist that sustainable seafood isn't just about eating what is currently sustainable, but making choices to help restore species in danger. "[S]ometimes the best way to do that may actually be to eat them. Sometimes by supporting the right players in the wrong industry, you actually help to change the whole industry," he says, adding that chefs have a large role to play in changing people's perceptions by offering what's freshest instead of what's expected and giving fish a smaller role on the dinner plate.

• A Push for Fracking Disclosure: A subcommittee of the U.S. Energy Department is recommending rules that would require natural gas drillers to disclose all of the chemicals they use during hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. In addition, Reuters reports, the natural gas advisory subcommittee says that while there is only "remote" chance for fracking to pollute water, there is "no economic or technical reason" not to reveal what chemicals are being used.

• Trump v Wind Power: The approval of 11 wind turbines in Aberdeen in the U.K. has raised the ire of Donald Trump, who is building a resort nearby with two golf courses, hotel, vacation homes and residential village. The European Offshore Wind Deployment Centre, though, is supported by renewable energy groups, businesses and politicians, Edie reports.

• Japan Renews View on Renewables: Japan's political parties have come to an agreement on a bill in support of renewable energy, also bringing about one of the conditions for Prime Minister Naoto Kan to resign. Under the bill, the government will subsidize electricity from wind, solar and geothermal sources. Kan pushed for the country to diversify its energy mix away from nuclear power after the Fukushima plant disaster caused by the earthquake and tsunami earlier  this year.

Landfill image CC-licensed by USACEpublicaffairs/Flickr